Category Archives: Show Notes

Admin Admin Podcast #096 Show Notes – Tech With A Cup Of Tea

Jon couldn’t make it for this episode again, however he should be back next time!

Jerry mentions that he is using NetData, for monitoring his own infrastructure and also for his clients. He mentions how it can be used as a Prometheus Exporter, as a standalone package, and also has a Cloud/SaaS offering.

He mentions how it can pick up services automatically (if Netdata supports them – Integrations). RPM-based packages are available in EPEL and a third-party Debian repository (more information here).

Jerry mentions that it can run effectively as an agent to send metrics back to Netdata Cloud, which is different from how Prometheus has worked traditionally.

Stuart mentions that Prometheus are now adding a new feature called Agent mode. This is to solve the issue of needing to get access to Prometheus on a site, without necessarily wanting to open up every site in firewalls/security groups or running VPNs.

Jerry mentions issues he’s having with Let’s Encrypt currently, with Apache Virtual Hosts, specifically in how to automate it with Ansible.

Stuart mentions moving away from using Apache and starting to use Caddy, as he moving to using containers for deploying his publicly available services. Caddy comes out of the box with Let’s Encrypt support, removing one of the challenges in automation.

He also uses Traefik at home, as not everything is container-based and Traefik makes a mixed environment quite straightforward to use. Traefik is more complex than Caddy, but does have some extra features that Stuart makes use of.

Jerry mentions Dehydrated, a BASH implementation of an ACME server (what Let’s Encrypt is based upon).

Stuart mentions that he has been overhauling his home infrastructure. His aim was to move to using Git to define his infrastructure more, rather than the mixture of some configuration management, some adhoc, some scripts, with no consistency.

He mentions using Gitea for source control, and finding the awesome-gitea repository for what can be used alongside Gitea. He mentions using Drone for continuous integration, which has allowed him to move most tasks from manually-triggered to triggered on changes in his Git repositories.

He has put a series of posts on his blog about it here: –

More posts on this are still to come!

Jerry asks about running Drone agents on something like Spot Instances or Spot Virtual Machines.

A discussion was had around our preferences on using an Open Source product with great documentation or a Commerial offering/SaaS with a support contract.

Stuart brought up the example of running something like Prometheus for monitoring (i.e. running a monitoring stack yourself) compared to something like Datadog that runs the monitoring stack for you.

Jerry mentions it is entirely dependent upon the service.

Stuart mentions that it can be nice to look through code to see where an issue might be that you are facing (and even contributing fixes).

Admin Admin Podcast #094 Show Notes – Observe closely

Jon couldn’t make it for this podcast due to a recent job change, but will be back soon

Stuart and Jerry talk some about their new jobs.

Stuart is a Site Reliability Engineer for a VoIP/Communications company. He talks about using PuppetTerraformNomad and Kubernetes. Jerry and Stuart both talk about the move to containers in both their jobs.

Jerry mentions learning Amazon AWS’s ECS (AWS managed Docker/Container solution) using Fargate. Stuart mentions using ECS previously, but using AWS EC2s rather than Fargate. Stuart also mentions that ECS is a lot simpler than Kubernetes, but the simplicity does have some trade offs.

Al mentions he has recently recertified his Azure Administrator Associate certiication. He mentions how the certifications are “point-in-time”, in that it doesn’t reflect some of the newer features.

Al also mentions the Late Night Linux Extra podcast episode featuring Martin Wimpress (of Ubuntu MATE and ex-Canonical fame) episode on Docker Slim

Al mentions Azure Web Apps, which are effectively Docker containers in the background.

Al asks an open question about monitoring and how it changes in the world of cloud, PaaS (Platform-As-AService) and microservices. He mentions how throwing machine resources at a problem doesn’t always fix an issue.

Stuart talks about the idea of contention in the cloud being desirable, compared to being avoided in on-premises environments. He mentions his issues with using purely thresholds for monitoring. He refers to distributed tracing to get insights into requests/services (especially when running across a number of microservices).

Stuart mentions the Golden Signals method of monitoring. He also refers to the Site Reliability Engineering handbook from Google.

Jerry mentions about using Prometheus for metrics, specifically the node_exporter as a lightweight agent for monitoring node metrics.

Stuart mentions OpenMetrics (which is the Prometheus metrics format but as an open standard) which can be exposed by any application, not just a specific exporter. He mentions adding this to his own applications, and writing exporters as well.

Stuart talks about eBPF, how it relates to monitoring, as well as tracing and forwarding packets. He mentions eBPF programs that are allowed to sit alongside the kernel itself, allowing direct kernel tracing or taking actions on network packets before they reach the kernel.

Stuart references Brendan Gregg and his website for information on eBPF usage and examples. He also later mentions Liz Rice for great information and tutorials on eBPF, having started learning eBPF because of her great tutorials.

Stuart mentions about start to learn C to be able to write eBPF programs. He also mentions that you can interact with eBPF programs using Go, Python, C and Rust, whereas the eBPF programs themselves are either in C or recently in Rust.

Al mentions that Azure Web Apps for PHP include Apache for PHP 7, and Nginx for PHP 8.

Jerry brings up Terragrunt, which is a thin wrapper for Terraform. Terragrunt extends Terraform with some useful features like being able to run Terraform across multiple directories, and to make Terraform DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself). It can also show a graph of dependencies too. Stuart mentions why separating Terraform files into different directories is desirable, but comes with a trade off that Terragrunt can help resolve.

Jerry mentions how using Terragrunt to separate environments and parameterise Terraform helps significantly with keeping repitition of code lower.

Al talks about Terraform Workspaces as a way of separating environments.

Al brings up the subject of other podcasts we listen to, including: –

  • Ship It – About deployment, infrastructure and the operation of software
  • Rent, Buy, Build – About the cloud native world and whether to use a managed solution, an off-the-shelf solution, or building it yourself for different technologies
  • Al’s Code Snippets Podcast – About Al’s journey into coding and his learnings along the way

Admin Admin Podcast #093 Show Notes – Coding up a storm

Al talks about the change from working for an MSP to working directly with teams of developers, and being part of a DevOps team. Al mentions helping them deploying code to Azure Functions (among other Azure technologies), using Azure DevOps.

Al also talks about using version control (using Git), and their Branching Strategy.

Stu mentions other stages of CI/CD to look at like Integration Testing and Feature Flags. He also mentions Canary Releases, related to Testing in production. Jon also mentions Blue/Green Deployments.

Jon mentions Observability of your applications and infrastructure.

Al mentions a Youtube channel that has interviews with DevOps/SRE professionals.

Al asks about tracing, and Stu explains why tracing and telemetry is becoming more important now that applications are being split into containers ("Microservices architecture").

Al asks about Jenkins, Stu mentions about the popularity of Jenkins. Jerry mentions how Jenkins being central to your deployments can be a problem, given how much access it often has to your estate.

Stu also mentions about the Jenkins plugin architecture, and how that there is almost always a plugin available for Jenkins to achieve a task, but it can make managing Jenkins a problem (dependencies can become an issue). He also mentions his preference on how to use Jenkins.

Stu mentions ArgoCD for managing Kubernetes deployments.

Jerry mentions the Groovy language, which is used to configure Jenkins jobs and pipelines.

Al mentions getting into coding as part of his job, and learning Python as well.

Jon mentions that he has started learning is NodeJS. He has worked with PHP in the past.

Jerry mentions Data Structures and Control Flow statements like for loops, while loops and more.

Stuart mentions the Binary Search (incorrectly referred to as a Binary Tree), which is more generally known as the Divide-and-conquer algorithm.

Stuart mentions learning Go, coming from using Python previously. He mentions the initial struggles with Types, but appreciating them eventually. He also mentions the advantages of Golang producing single binaries, and how prevalent Golang is in the industry.

Jon mentions "Duck Typing", as well as Hack, a typed version of PHP.

Jon also mentions how Javascript deals with "Duck Typing", shown a video called Wat.

Stu mentions Python now having Type Hints, which gives Python a more comprehensive type system.

Stu mentions Syntax Highlighting and Intelligent code completion. Editors/IDEs like Visual Studio Code or IntelliJ have this inbuilt, Stu mentions using coc.nvim with ViM and NeoVim for this.

Jerry talks about client side and server side rendering for applications. Stu makes reference to a Bad Voltage episode that mentions this too.

Jon mentions that you can open up the JavaScript console in web browsers, and potentially opens up security issues. Jon also mentions a talk from Stuart Langridge about client-side rendering and Javascript in general.

Jon also mentions Unhosted applications.

Al asks about Domain-Specific Languages. Jerry mentions tools like Terraform and Ansible that use them for declaring resources/tasks and more.

Stu also mentions Hashicorp’s HCL, that was heavily inspired by libucl, which in turn was inspired by the configuration for NGINX.

Admin Admin Podcast #092 Show Notes – Cloud Native Master of Puppets

We’re without Al again this episode, but we carry on regardless!

Stu talks about Puppet which is a configuration management system, comparable to Ansible, Salt Stack or Chef.

Like Chef and Salt, Puppet is predominently agent based, where the agent is installed on the endpoint, and it calls out to a central server, every X period of time (Jerry mentions 30 minutes at one point in the show, while Stu says 15 minutes) to get the state the device should be in, and it then tries to remediate all those items which are not compliant with the state.

Puppet is more like Chef than Ansible or Salt in that it uses a Ruby “Domain Specific Language” (or DSL) to define the configuration of the node, rather than YAML.

We then get into a more general conversation about configuration management software, including talking about how Salt Stack allows you to create entire tasks and variables using jinja2 templates, and Jon mentions he did something like this with Ansible variables. Jon mentions seeing a video from an early PuppetConf where a member of the board (he thinks the CTO) decided to learn Puppet by wiping and reinstalling his machine every day using Puppet. Sadly, he can’t find this video now, and would appreciate listeners pointing him to that video, if they can find it!

Jon talks about Architecture Decision Records (or “All” Decision Records) writing bash scripts, and using BATS to perform unit testing of bash files. He also mentions that it’s possible to “mock” specific commands in BATS.

Lastly, Stu proposes we talk at about using Cloud Native services in AWS, Azure, etc. versus using Infrastructure as a Service. A series of specific services on AWS and Azure are mentioned. We talk about how vendor-lock-in can occur and some of the things you can do to help prevent that. Jon mentions the books “The Phoenix Project” and “The Unicorn Project” by Gene Kim which discuss the idea of “Core” services (which make money for the company or project) and “Context” services (which don’t, and can be outsourced.) We also talk about the issues involved in not transforming your services when you “Lift and Shift” services into a cloud service.

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.

Admin Admin Podcast #091 Show Notes – A Comedy of Errors

Jon brought Nick "Mohclips" into the podcast to talk to us about some of the things he does.

Nick talks about "Gold Images" – and mentions that he’s created images because of issues of provenance. He mentions docker containers holding cryptocurrency miners. We agree that you should check the images you’re downloading are coming from the vendors of those images, as it’s not just on Docker, there are also issues with at least AWS (Amazon Web Services) public AMIs (AWS Machine Image) and Azure public VM images too.

We also discuss CIS (Center for Internet Security) hardening guides and Nick mentions that he uses Ansible to implement the controls. Jon mentions an interview with Jeff Geerling to quote some numbers of Ansible Modules.

We talk a bit about Ansible 3, and Collections which are formally introduced in this release.

We talk about Semantic versioning, and explain about how movements in version numbers should explain why you would move between one major version number and the next, or between a major.minor version number, or between a major.minor.patch version number and the next.

Next Nick talks about ServerSpec, a set of RSpec tests for servers and Jerry suggests that Nick might be talking about Inspec instead. Jerry also mentions Molecule which is similar. Jerry asks whether Nick uses a CI/CD (Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery or Continuous Deployment) system. Nick explains why he doesn’t.

Nick mentions he’s a "Lazy Engineer". Nick also mentions Kanban boards in passing.

Jerry talks about Netdata. Stu talks about Pulumi. Jerry talks again about Tinkerbell which was linked to from DevOps Weekly. Stu mentions that Tinkerbell was also mentioned on an Equinix Metal blog post which also covers quite a bit of Pulumi too.

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.

Admin Admin Podcast #090 Show Notes- Rise and Shine

 

Al is using remote state in Azure using Azure Blob Storage.

John mentions terraformer using this to import infrastructure into the tfstate file.

Jerry mentions using “terraform import” to import Azure Resources.

Al ask about output.tf.

John mentions his blogpost.

Al mentions the youtube channel he’s been following for Tutorials about Terraform.

Jerry mentions that Centos 6 EOL was November 30th 2020 and Ubuntu 16.04 will be on April 30th 2021.

Al mentions the Naming vs Tagging blog post.

Al mentions that he now using unraid for his nas. Jon mentions following this 2.5 admins podcast episode.

Admin Admin Podcast #089 Show Notes – Unexpected Depth

First episode of 2021! We’re in lockdown number 3 in England!

Jon admits to writing a private-only diary using WordPress (he doesn’t mention he also has a separate photo diary). Jerry mentions that another of his friends also has recently started a diary using WordPress, and suggests that maybe this is a new trend.

Jon is also Internet Famous due to a post he made on StatusNet in 2009 (mirrored to twitter) that got captured in the screenshot of a StatusNet client and posted to Wikipedia.

Jon wrote a post on his blog talking about how he got into his career. He would encourage anyone else to write something similar, particularly if they’ve taken an unusual route into their career!

Al asks the team what he should learn about. He talks about the tooling they’re using – BambooAzure DevOpsTerraformAnsible. We talk a bit about what Bamboo is, what a code pipeline entails, and how they’ve used it. Jon mentions that Lorna Jane Mitchell talks about moving from Travis to Github Actions on her Twitch Stream. We then drill into using Terraform modules.

Jon mentions about “Architecture Decision Records” and cites files in the gov.uk public repo as an example of this. It’s similar in principle to IETF RFCs. He found it via the Last Week in AWS newsletter issue 195 (which at the time of writing was only available to subscribers). He mentions the tooling (“adr-tools“) which you can use to write these records.

Al then asks where we find time to learn. We all talk about what we do, some at more length than others.

Al talks about being OK about being alone. He mentions about his life coach, the “Alonement” podcast, and the talk he gave at OggCamp about staying positive on a digital world.

Jon then reminds our listeners to check in with family, friends, colleagues and neighbours to make sure they’re OK.

Admin Admin Podcast #088 Show Notes – Speculative execution

This is a predictions show. To save you from being spoiled what the predictions are, there will just be some links to terms and articles mentioned in the show. The rules are inspired by the Bad Voltage accumulation of prediction rules revealed in episode 2×62. We make reference to the fact that in the most recent predictions review show (episode 3×19) the haggling for fractions of a point are unbelievable. It’s amazing 🙂

This had the impact of making some of the predictions being walked back…

So, with that, on to the terms of note:

Wrap up

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.

Admin Admin Podcast #087 Show Notes – Feedback Loop

In this bumper feedback episode we talk about line endings in files, OpenStack, secrets management, and protecting your network.

  • Iain asks:

    Hello all,

    I hear a lot about Openstack but whenever I try to find out stuff about it, I get vague buzzword-laden and vague comments from “evangelists”. Could any of you guys explain to an IT-literate but not a sysadmin end user, what the hell Openstack is?

    Stu explains what OpenStack is built for, where it’s often deployed these days, and some of the issues he’s seen with it.

    Jon talks about some of the components inside OpenStack, and how OpenStack upgrades can have issues.

    Jon and Stu talk about companies who were selling OpenStack distributions, and comparisons to Kubernetes.

    Jerry mentions that many of the problems OpenStack was created to solve are now mostly solved by Kubernetes. He also mentions that we discussed Kubernetes in Episode 51.

    Jon mentions Eucalyptus, nominally as an alternative to using AWS S3 or OpenStack Swift (the object storage module), but also mentions it could be used to virtualize some of the other services provided by AWS.

  • Al asked about “Dark Matter Engineering” which he’s heard about on Coder Radio. We presume it’s code that isn’t released into the public, or never gets any traction. We also discuss Linode and compare it to Digital Ocean as a result of the adverts run on Coder Radio.

  • Jay provides some feedback:

    Hi, in your last podcast someone mentioned having an issue with VSCode in windows always saying that files were all edited.

    What’s probably going on is a wrong setting for the core.autocrlf setting.

    You can fix it by opening powershell in windows and running

    git config --global core.autocrlf input

    https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Customizing-Git-Git-Configuration#_formatting_and_whitespace

    There are 3 settings, but I always recommend the ‘input’ one, as it converts everything to LF endings on commit, and checks out without modification.

    Also, you may be interested in a recent networking video series I made: https://jaytuckey.name/2020/10/18/how-websites-load-a-deep-dive-into-the-ip-network-stack-and-how-it-is-used-to-connect-to-a-site/

    Jon talks about how he’s got Microsoft’s Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) setup and how he organizes his “My Documents” directory structure. He mentions “Symbolic Links” to easily find Windows directories in his WSL environment.

    We also talk about Line Endings (CR – Carriage ReturnLF – Line Feed, CR+LF). Jon incorrectly recalls CR as ASCII character 10 (it should be 13) and LF as ASCII character 13 (it should be 10).

  • WIE E asks for help with Secrets Management in a Continuous Integration (CI)/Continuous Delivery (CD)/Continuous Deployment (CD) environment.

    Stu talks about GitlabHashiCorp Vault, and AWS IAM roles, which Jerry extends to include Azure System Assigned Identities. Jerry mentions that you can use your provisioning system to create a per-system key during a build, which never commit to your version control system.

    Jon mentions about protecting CI/CD/CD systems and references the exploit of a CI/CD system on the Matrix.org project.

  • Yannick asks:

    VPN: always on or not?

    How to protect the target network – i.e. does my machine becomes the weakest link in the network and what can/should I do to protect the network ?

    Jon talks about his views on always-on Client-to-Server Virtual Private Network (VPN) connections.

    Al mentions that he thought the question was talking about Site-to-Site VPNs, and Jon suggests that VPNs typically now auto-establish themselves when traffic is initiated from the “Encryption Domain” on one side of the network to the “Encryption Domain” on the other side of the network. Jon refers to IPsec Phase 1 and Phase 2 which are two stages of a VPN tunnel, dealing with the initial connection between the “left” and “right” sides of a VPN tunnel, and the connections between two encryption domains (subnets or hosts at either end of the tunnel). Jon also mentions about various encryption algorithms like DESTriple DESAES, and hashing algorithms like SHA1.

    Jerry quotes “Clarke’s Third Law“: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

    Jon mentions about the Diffie Hellman Key Exchange video, and then talks about browse-down management environments and references the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) End User Device security guidance for hardening machines. He also talks about segregating network segments for protecting trusted and untrusted networks, and then goes into “Zero Trust” networks, mentions “CASB“. Jon and Stu both talk about broadcast domains in a network, and how you can work around that.

    Jerry mentions about Bastion Hosts, and Jon explains why they’re not really a good idea.

    Jon butchers talking about User Behaviour Analytics (UBA) systems. He also mentions about a protocol break.

Wrap up

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.

Admin Admin Podcast #086 Show Notes – Committed to Cloud

The whole crew is back together for the first time in a while, talking about: Git commit hooks, Windows as a development environment, cloud network firewalls, and Azure DevOps.

What have we been up to?

  • Jerry started a new job, and he’s re-started using Windows 10 as part of his job after a few years of using OSX and Linux. He’s using Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). We talk a bit about the difference between WSL 1 and WSL 2, and comment about how WSL 2 uses Hyper-V and what that means compared to using VirtualBox or VMWare for virtual machines. We compare WSL 1 to a “reverse” WINE.
  • Stu mentions that you can’t run some network controls (like traceroute) with WSL 1 because some of the kernel calls are not available.
  • Jon notes that he used the terraform for Windows binary in WSL by mistake and couldn’t authenticate to AWS because he’d installed the AWS CLI for Linux. Installing Terraform for Linux and also putting the AWS configuration files into both the Linux expected path (~/.aws/config) and the Windows expected path (%UserProfile%\.aws) worked around this issue!
  • Jon then mentions using /etc/wsl.conf to configure mounting the Windows drives into WSL, and notes that you can configure it to permit POSIX style file permissions with this sample:
[automount]
options = "metadata"
  • Jon also creates a symbolic link between /mnt/c/Users/Jon/Documents and ~/Documents to “easily” get into the Windows paths that are backed up in Windows.
  • Jerry notes that he’s using the Windows version of Virtual Desktops. He’s also using the Microsoft Terminal application.
  • Al mentions that if you navigate to \\wsl$ in Windows Explorer, you can access the Linux file system from Windows Subsystem for Linux. Stu mentions he has this open in the left hand pane in Explorer all the time!
  • Al said he’s using Visual Studio Code (VSCode), and uses that to open Windows Subsystem for Linux, and he also mentioned that if you type in code in any path in WSL (or Command Prompt, for that matter [ed.]) it will open that folder in Visual Studio Code.
  • Jerry notes that he’s just moved to using VSCode, but has installed the Vim extension. Jon asks whether he’s installed the “Butterflies” extension, referring to an XKCD comic.
  • We talk briefly about using Git in VSCode, versus using it from the command line. Jon mentions a specific bug he has. Jon talks about the differences in line endings between Linux and Windows systems.
  • Al talks about using Azure DevOps with it’s pipelines. We talk about it’s history, and compare it to other products. Al mentions using Azure DevOps to trigger Terraform using PowerShell. Al also mentions using AWX (the open source upstream version of Ansible Tower), and having an agent for Azure Devops running on his AWX service.
  • Jon mentions the DevOps.fm podcast in the context of Azure DevOps. Stu asks about running PowerShell on Linux. Jerry mentions a Binary Times podcast episode where they interview the person, “dementor”/”the mentor” who runs the Powershell On Linux, Al mentions the Makers Corner podcast which also interviewed the same person.
  • Jon is writing Terraform to deliver 3rd party security appliances in AWS and Azure. He notes that most of the AWS appliances use a Transit Gateway to set this up. Jerry and Stu mention how they use Terraform Modules. Jerry mentions automating Jenkins with Terraform. Stu and Jon talk about using count and for each statements. Jon also mentions about defining which “providers” to use in the Terraform files. He also notes that you can get into a dependency loop if you have several modules with different provider files. Talking of Providers, Jon mentions using the “null” provider, but doesn’t explain what he uses it for.
  • Jon talks about Git hooks, and Jerry talks about a python project called pre-commit which can help to automate some of these pre-commit hooks, like calling a linter or a unit testing system (like ShellCheck) before the commit completes. Stu mentions using the GitLab Continious Integration (CI) system instead of using Pre-Commit hooks. Jon suggests when it might be preferable to use Pre-Commit hooks instead.
  • Stu mentions about SourceHut, which is an alternative to GitHub which uses email for patch sharing.
  • Al talks about using the Azure Firewall product, and Jon and Al drills down into how Azure Networking works. Jon then explains how High Availability events occur in AWS and Azure with 3rd party firewalls. Jon also mentions AWS Firewall Manager. Jon also mentions that Terraform and Ansible have code to write and amend AWS and Azure Firewall rules.

Feedback

  • We received feedback (although the source has now been lost) about how we pronounced “Oriented” as “Orientated”. These are both valid words in UK English and are interchangable in UK English.

Wrap up

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.

Admin Admin Podcast #085 Show Notes – Verbosely build your objects

No Jerry this time, but we do have Al back!

What have we been up to?

Feedback

  • Wayne (from the Binary Times podcast) contacted us to suggest that we’re not being very good at explaining what terms mean. We try to clear some of the terms up that we use!

Techniques for Rebuilding a machine using Post-Provisioning Tools (like Ansible)

  • Jon suggests a process of using Git on /etc/ and /home/<user>/ with Vagrant to test each stage of the build, and to see what files are changed by each action performed. Once you’ve got your build instructions based on that, you can use something like Ansible, SaltPuppet or Chef to apply pos-install statements.
  • Stu mentions using Chocolatey for installing packages in Windows. Jon mentions that using BoxStarter works well for automating Chocolately installs. He mentions using boxstarter paths which are currently not documented – https://boxstarter.org/package/<yourpackage> and https://boxstarter.org/package/url/?some_path_to_a_boxstarter_set_of_instructions.
  • Jon mentions the Ubuntu Server Vagrant Box file, and the Desktopify script written by Martin Wimpress. He also talks about provisioning Windows machines where Terraform renames machines and adds them to the Active Directory Domain.

Object Orientated Programming

  • Al wanted to know more about what Object Orientated Programming (OOP) is, as he’s started looking at ASP.NET and has previously only known Classic ASP. Jon talks about it from his previous PHP experience and perspective. Jon talks about when he used OOP in a previous role to perform network device backups. Jon mentions he’d used OOP in CCHits.net and the now defunct CampFireManager.

Wrap up

We’re a member of the Other Side Podcast Network. The lovely Dave Lee does our Audio Production.

We want to remind our listeners that we have a Telegram channel and email address if you want to contact the hosts. We also have Patreon, if you’re interested in supporting the show. Details can all be found on our Contact Us page.